No Logo: 10th Anniversary Edition with a New Introduction by the Author [ebook] by Naomi Klein (epub/mobi)

NO LOGO was an international bestseller and “a movement bible” (The New York Times).  Naomi Klein’s second book, The Shock Doctrine, was hailed as a “master narrative of our time,” and has over a million copies in print worldwide.
 
In the last decade, No Logo has become an international phenomenon and a cultural manifesto for the critics of unfettered capitalism worldwide.  As America faces a second economic depression, Klein’s analysis of our corporate and branded world is as timely and powerful as ever.
 
Equal parts cultural analysis, political manifesto, mall-rat memoir, and journalistic exposé, No Logo is the first book to put the new resistance into pop-historical and clear economic perspective.  Naomi Klein tells a story of rebellion and self-determination in the face of our new branded world.

In the global economy, all the world’s a marketing opportunity. From this elemental premise, freelance journalist and Toronto Star columnist Klein methodically builds an angry and funny case against branding in general and several large North American companies in particular, notably Gap, Microsoft and Starbucks. Looking around her, Klein finds that the breathless promise of the information ageAthat it would be a time of consumer choice and interactive communicationAhas not materialized. Instead, huge corporations that present themselves as lifestyle purveyors rather than mere product manufacturers dominate the airwaves, physical space and cyberspace. Worse, Klein argues, these companies have harmed not just the culture but also workersAand not just in the Third World but also in the U.S., where companies rely on temps because they’d rather invest in marketing than in labor. In the latter sections, Klein describes a growing backlash embodied by the guerrilla group Reclaim the Streets, which turns busy intersections into spaces for picnics and political protest. Her tour of the branded world is rife with many perverse examples of how corporate names penetrate all aspects of life (who knew there was a K-Mart Chair of Marketing at Wayne State University?). Mixing an activist’s passion with sophisticated cultural commentary, Klein delivers some elegant formulations: “Free speech is meaningless if the commercial cacophony has risen to the point where no one can hear you.”  ~ Publisher Weekly


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