The Age of Spiritual Machines: When Computers Exceed Human Intelligence [ebook] by Ray Kurzweil (epub/mobi)

Ray Kurzweil is the inventor of the most innovative and compelling technology of our era, an international authority on artificial intelligence, and one of our greatest living visionaries. Now he offers a framework for envisioning the twenty-first century–an age in which the marriage of human sensitivity and artificial intelligence fundamentally alters and improves the way we live. Kurzweil’s prophetic blueprint for the future takes us through the advances that inexorably result in computers exceeding the memory capacity and computational ability of the human brain by the year 2020 (with human-level capabilities not far behind); in relationships with automated personalities who will be our teachers, companions, and lovers; and in information fed straight into our brains along direct neural pathways. Optimistic and challenging, thought-provoking and engaging, The Age of Spiritual Machines is the ultimate guide on our road into the next century.

Kurzweil’s reasoned scenarios of a “post-biological future” are as harrowing as any science fiction. That’s the appeal of listening on tape to the inventor and MIT professor’s provocative speculations on what could occur once computers reach or surpass human-level intelligenceAthen start to self-replicate. Computers, with their integrated circuit chip complexity, are sneaking up on us on an accelerated curve, he argues, citing the example of chess master Gary Kasparov’s shocking loss to IBM’s machine Deep Blue in 1997. Do computers represent “the next stage of evolution”? Will technology create its own next generations? Kurzweil suggests a timeline inhabited by “neural-nets,” “nanobot” robots and scenarios of virtual reality where sexuality and spirituality become completely simulated. It’s bracing and compelling stuff, propelled by the author’s own strong egotistical will to prove his version of the future. Reader Sklar is thoughtful, if at times overly heavy on the ironies. ~ Publisher Weekly


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